Writing abstracts for scientific papers database

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Abstracts of scientific papers are sometimes poorly written, often lack important information, and occasionally convey a biased picture. This paper provides detailed suggestions, with examples, for writing the background, methods, results, and conclusions sections of a good abstract.

Writing abstracts for scientific papers database

Philip KoopmanCarnegie Mellon University October, Abstract Because on-line search databases typically contain only abstracts, it is vital to write a complete but concise description of your work to entice potential readers into obtaining a copy of the full paper. This article describes how to write a good computer architecture abstract for both conference and journal papers.

Writers should follow a checklist consisting of: Following this checklist should increase the chance of people taking the time to obtain and read your complete paper.

Introduction Now that the use of on-line publication databases is prevalent, writing a really good abstract has become even more important than it was a decade ago. Abstracts have always served the function of "selling" your work. But now, instead of merely convincing the reader to keep reading the rest of the attached paper, an abstract must convince the reader to leave the comfort of an office and go hunt down a copy of the article from a library or worse, obtain one after a long wait through inter-library loan.

In a business context, an "executive summary" is often the only piece of a report read by the people who matter; and it should be similar in content if not tone to a journal paper abstract. Parts of an Abstract Despite the fact that an abstract is quite brief, it must do almost as much work as the multi-page paper that follows it.

In a computer architecture paper, this means that it should in most cases include the following sections. Each section is typically a single sentence, although there is room for creativity.

In particular, the parts may be merged or spread among a set of sentences.

writing abstracts for scientific papers database

Use the following as a checklist for your next abstract: Why do we care about the problem and the results? If the problem isn't obviously "interesting" it might be better to put motivation first; but if your work is incremental progress on a problem that is widely recognized as important, then it is probably better to put the problem statement first to indicate which piece of the larger problem you are breaking off to work on.

This section should include the importance of your work, the difficulty of the area, and the impact it might have if successful. What problem are you trying to solve? What is the scope of your work a generalized approach, or for a specific situation?

Be careful not to use too much jargon. In some cases it is appropriate to put the problem statement before the motivation, but usually this only works if most readers already understand why the problem is important. How did you go about solving or making progress on the problem?

Did you use simulation, analytic models, prototype construction, or analysis of field data for an actual product? What was the extent of your work did you look at one application program or a hundred programs in twenty different programming languages?

What important variables did you control, ignore, or measure? Specifically, most good computer architecture papers conclude that something is so many percent faster, cheaper, smaller, or otherwise better than something else.

Put the result there, in numbers. Avoid vague, hand-waving results such as "very", "small", or "significant. There is a tension here in that you should not provide numbers that can be easily misinterpreted, but on the other hand you don't have room for all the caveats.The leading bibliographic database providing abstracts and indexing to the world's scientific and technical papers in physics, electrical engineering, electronics, communications, control engineering, computing, information technology, manufacturing, production, and mechanical engineering.

List of academic databases and search engines Jump to Contains an abstracts database and an electronic paper collection, arranged by discipline. Unofficial register of scientific names & papers in Zoology.

Coverage –present. Subscription Clarivate . Jun 28,  · Scientific publications are an important source of information and knowledge in Academics, Research and development. When articles are submitted for publication, the 1st part that comes across and causes an impact on the minds of the readers is the abstract.

Library. Our open-source library houses the thousands of documents, periodicals, maps and reports released to the public.

List of academic databases and search engines - Wikipedia

Abstracts of scientific papers are sometimes poorly written, often lack important information, and occasionally convey a biased picture. This paper provides detailed suggestions, with examples, for writing the background, methods, results, and conclusions sections of a good abstract.

Apr 01,  · How to Write a Scientific Abstract Three Parts: Preparing to Write an Abstract Structuring an Abstract Checking Style and Flow Community Q&A A scientific abstract summarizes your research paper or article in a concise, clearly written way that informs readers about the article's content%(5).

Writing Scientific Abstracts Presentation // Purdue Writing Lab