Why television is a drug

Television viewers are inundated with drug ads from Big Pharma. Have you ever heard of these drugs?

Why television is a drug

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Background and aims: The most popular recreational pastime in the U. Some researchers have claimed that television may be addictive. We provide a review of the definition, etiology, prevention and treatment of the apparent phenomenon of television addiction.

Next, we provide information on its prevention and treatment. We suggest that television addiction may function similarly to substance abuse disorders but a great deal more research is needed. Addictions do not include only behaviors typically associated with excess and being a waste of potentially productive time e.

Addictions may include behaviors that may be intrinsically life-fulfilling but have appeared to spiral out of control e. Addictions also may include behaviors that are often intrinsically not associated with excess, are not generally considered life-fulfilling, but are often considered a waste Why television is a drug productive time e.

Drugs, Food-related, Compulsive anti-social behavior e. Television addiction is an example of a technology addiction, according to this scheme. Widespread television viewing began in in Great Britain http: Prior to that time, before TV was widely available, there could not be a phenomenon of television addiction.

However, the suggestion of the existence of television addiction began shortly after widespread viewing in the U. The first survey study on television addiction was conducted by Smith in Smith,which led to questioning the prevalence of the phenomenon though a majority of subjects perceived the existence of the phenomenon but did identify a small sample of self-identified television addicts who viewed twice as much television as others.

Television viewing remains the most popular form of leisure activity in the United States an average of 2. Clearly, wide variation exists regarding what is considered heavy viewing, and the addictive aspect is more a function of interference with completion of life tasks rather than number of hours of viewing per se Horvath, Because of the sheer amount of time people view TV, however, and because of the apparent consensus that TV addiction exists, this is an avenue of addiction research worth pursuing.

Commentary

There has been argumentation and a little evidence for an opposing perspective regarding the impact of TV viewing, and the existence of TV addiction. For example, one discussion piece argued that television has been a scapegoat for social ills, derived in part from a television-as-drug metaphor Mittell, Also, one study of college student subjects found that television viewing was inversely related to sensation seeking, alcohol, and drug use, and positively associated with religiosity, suggesting that it was an innocuous activity Finn, Furthermore, television may facilitate relationship bonding e.

That is, television viewing can be a communal experience, as many television viewers come together to view and discuss programs Andrejevic, ; Bagley, Thus, TV may exert positive as well as negative effects.

However, just as alcohol use may serve a social lubrication function for some people and a source of drug dependence for others, so might TV operate differentially. The purpose of this paper is to attempt to summarize the work that has been completed on television as an addiction, including its qualification as an addiction and its assessment, etiology of television addiction, and its potential prevention and treatment.

In Google Scholar there were and pages found, respectively accessed August 22, In Ovid MedLine August Week 3 there were only two pages, and zero pages found, respectively. In total, we were only able to locate 33 published, relevant studies on the topic outside of books and dissertations. In the next section of this paper we briefly review examples of negative consequences of excessive TV viewing.

Results Examples of negative consequences of TV viewing Consequences mentioned in a cursory search of the literature include the impact of relatively heavy television viewing on a creating political or social biases e. Regarding the last consequence, for example, children 8—16 years old who watched four or more hours of TV per day were found to have greater body fat and a higher body mass index than those who watched less than two hours per day Hancox et al.A Short History of Drugs (On TV) episodes.

The show delves into the dark underworld of the meth trade and, in doing so, adds to a storied history of drug representation on TV. In honor of the upcoming series conclusion, we’ve decided to look back and explore some TV moments that reflected and defined the role of drugs in American life. Television viewers are inundated with drug ads from Big Pharma.

Introduction

It’s a flood. Why? Who is going to remember to ask their doctor whether these and other obscure meds are right for them? What’s going on here? The answer is: IT DOESN’T MATTER WHAT DRUGS ARE BEING ADVERTISED. The Binge. The glaring similarity would obviously be the way in which a good series and a drug are consumed.

Binge watching a TV show is similar to binge drug use because both driven by massive compulsion.

Why television is a drug

Food and Drug Administration Loopholes. The United States and New Zealand are the only countries in the world that allow direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals.

The Deeper Reason for Drug Ads on Television

Most countries banned. Enough. TV is a drug - anti-social, addictive and bad for you. The TV set is already a kind of hypodermic syringe, offering a quick route to the nervous system.

For example, one discussion piece argued that television has been a scapegoat for social ills, derived in part from a television-as-drug metaphor (Mittell, ).

Also, one study of college student subjects found that television viewing was inversely related to sensation seeking, alcohol, and drug use, and positively associated with religiosity.

Drug ads on TV should be banned - Washington Times